​Replacing Bicycle Fork – Not As Tough As You Might Think

Replacing Bicycle Fork – Not As Tough As You Might Think

This may not be something that happens a lot, but there are some pretty good reasons out there why you might want to replace your front bike fork. According to the article Replacing Your Front Fork, the reasons might be as follows:

  • ​To upgrade your shock absorbers on your mountain bike
  • ​To allow the attachment of disc brakes
  • ​To repair or replace a dented or broken fork
  • ​To add on a lighter more updated racing style fork

These are just a few of the reasons; you may have your own. The article does a really good job of breaking the process down into little bite sized chunks and adds in lots of very helpful pictures. For me, I prefer lots of pictures. I find that it allows me to visualize what is actually going to happen even before I start.

It may sound like this is a very complicated procedure, but as long as you have some basic tools, you should have no problem getting the job done. The summarized steps to get your fork replaced are:

  • ​Remove the brakes, handlebars and of course the front wheel.
  • ​To remove the brakes you will need a hex wrench to remove the brake bolt. Once the bolt has been removed, the brakes should slide right off.
  • ​Typically you will have cable ties that attach the cables (of even speedometer wires) to the bike frame. You just snip these right off.
  • ​Remove your handle bar stem and any spacers by loosening the bolts that attach it to your bike frame.
  • ​Once the stem is removed, the forks should be free to drop right out of your steering tube. The article above also discusses some more complicated setups that need a few extra steps to get the fork out of the steering tube. Nice pictures too which helps.
  • ​There are 2 types of headsets (threaded and unthreaded). Both removal processes are discussed so it makes for a very thorough read.
  • ​Once the old fork is out, the new one can be added on by reversing the process described above. Again, there are more details that will guide you in the article itself.
    Once the old fork is out, the new one can be added on by reversing the process described above. Again, there are more details that will guide you in the article itself.

​There you have it, the old fork has been removed and the new one installed. While not an everyday occurrence, this is procedure that can be performed by the average person as long as they have some common tools available to them.

I’m curious to know if any of you have actually replaced your own forks and the time that it took you to do it? Let me know how you made out and if this article was of any help. I’m out!

Robert Flaherty